Monday, October 25, 2021

Star-crossed Quilt




I had a few fabrics that I thought would be pretty in a star block. That’s how I usually start a quilt… I see a few prints or colors that stand out, then think of how I’d like to see them in a quilt. Most times I use a variety of fabric lines, even vintage pieces, because I want it to be truly unique…a quilt that I can’t even replicate.

Once I had most of the blocks made, I felt they needed to have a bit of separation, so I added some blue sashing. Then decided to add some white to the blue. Now when I look at the quilt, sometimes I see stars and sometimes I see crosses. I think I’ll do another one in more distinct colors and see how it turns out.

This one is a good throw quilt size at 55” x 67”.
You can find it in my Honeysuckle Lane Etsy shop now.


The back is pieced from many of the fabrics used on the front.



I do all my piecing and machine quilting on a Juki TL-2000Qi, whichI love! I always work with an OttLite or two, as well. They make such a difference!




All of the outdoor photos were taken in the little community where I grew up… just up the hill from my old home place.

As I’ve said before, sewing the binding by hand if my favorite part of quilt making.

I’ll be back soon with a few more quilts. I’m trying to get them all listed in time for Christmas shopping. 
If you think of it, quilts usually last for many, many years and make very special gifts.

Thanks for stopping by!
God bless, Lana

Monday, October 18, 2021

Just a Pretty Little Quilt


Last year, I think it was last year and not this year, I made a sweet baby quilt.

I used a variety of fabrics: a soft and delicate pink batik, a pretty vintage floral sheet, and four prints from a Bari J collection.

The back of this baby quilt is a vintage cotton stripe sheet.

I made the double-fold French binding from several shades of pink and gold solid cottons.

I washed and dried it, as I do all my handmade quilts before listing them. I want you to see how it will look in real life. Some people are surprised how crinkly a quilt can be after it comes out of the dryer. Personally, I love it! That just makes it that much more cozy. 



You can find all my quilts in my Honeysuckle Lane Etsy shop. If you don’t do Etsy and see a quilt you like, just send me an email.

Thanks for stopping by!
Take care &God bless,
Lana

Friday, October 15, 2021

Country Roads Quilt

 


I named this quilt Country Roads… yes, with John Denver’s song in mind. It is everything I love about a quilt. It’s cozy, scrappy, and nostalgic! And the photos taken outside were on a little country road in the community where I grew up. It makes me a little teary-eyed thinking of that, but it shouldn’t. I still go to church in that little community every week.

WhenI made this quilt, I thought of the squares as home and all of the strips as roads leading to home. The next Country Roads quilt I make will have either a red or yellow center, representing the heart of the home or the light of the home… similar to a log cabin quilt.

I am slowly adding all my finished quilts to my Honeysuckle Lane shop, and I’ll be blogging about more of them as I find time.


As for the design, I’m not sure what it’s called, but I recently saw a video by Beth Shibley showing how to make the inset squares and I was hooked! 


The back is made from a vintage brown plaid and a few scraps left over from the front of this quilt.


I’ll admit, basting is what I dread about quilt making. That’s probably why I have several quilt tops made but not finished. But once I get started, I am excited to machine quilt it and add the binding.


My Juki TL-2000Qi is perfect for straight line quilting. I purchased mine second hand a few years ago, but you can find new ones here.


I usually save hand-stitching the binding for watching tv in the evenings.



Not everyone shops on Etsy, so if you see a quilt you like, just email me and I can invoice directly.


Monday, September 27, 2021

Batiks + Bari J. = Half Square Triangles Quilt

 


This is another quilt I made using colorful batiks and a beautiful Bari J. fabric collection! I did simple half square triangles and went for a wildly, bohemian, scrappy look. The black binding was the only solid in the entire quilt.






Sewn and quilted on my Juki TL2000QI. I bought mined used through Craigslist and have not been disappointed. I’d buy another one in a heartbeat if I needed another machine.



I always enjoy the last step… hand stitching the binding.




This one is sold, but there are more quilts in my Etsy shop. A quilt makes a wonderful, unique gift… one that will last for years, even generations, and will become a treasured heirloom. And how often can you wrap up in a piece of art?! 😊

Batiks + Bari J = A Happy Boho Quilt!

 


I’ve always loved batik fabrics… the colors, the variegated shades in one piece, and the feel of the fabric. And then I discovered Bari J. fabrics… oooh, the colors and designs! You will never have a drab, boring quilt if you work with Bari’s prints!

To make this quilt, I started with a layer cake (10” squares) of Bari J. 365 Fifth Avenue and a layer cake of batiks. The batiks were a mixed set from an ebay seller. I cut each 10” square into 3 strips: a 3” strip, a 2” strip, and a 5” strip. Then I switched the 2” strips of the batik with a coordinating Bari J. fabric. Sew together with 1/4” seams. Press the seams outward. Then add the batik strips to the center of all the Bari J. blocks. Once all the blocks are sewn and pressed, square up each block. Then arrange, stitch your blocks into rows, then stitch rows together. I used batik fabric for my backing, and a Kona cotton solid for the binding. I love making and hand stitching the binding!

This one and a similar quilt have already sold but I’ll be adding more to my Etsy shop. You can find them here.

Once again, my photos loaded out of order, so I’ll just do a quick explanation of how I pieced the blocks. Step 1-4 are shown in reverse. 🥴


Step 4: Press seams outward

Step 3: Sew a 1/4” seam. This is how it will look after pressing.


Step 2: Switch center batik strip for a Bari J. strip.


Step 1. Cut 3”, 2”, and 5” strips of all squares.

Take a photo and view in black and white to see where some blocks may need to be re-arranged.

Arrange blocks on the wall to find a layout that you like.